5 Ways Pitch Perfect Should Inform Your Content Strategy

by 

After nine months spent writing a book about content, content marketing and content strategy, I felt brain dead. My husband lovingly suggested we take our family away to the beach so I could “recover” for a few days.

While buying the usual sunscreen and other beach necessities, I noticed the DVD of the movie Pitch Perfect. I had watched the movie on a girls’ movie night, and thought it was super cute. Having two girls, ages 10 and 7, I thought it would be the perfect movie to while away the time we spent driving to the beach.

Read the rest here

Read About How Hotels Get You To Reuse Towels. Everyone’s Doing It.

by ERIC JAFFE

Researchers have figured out how to create (almost) perfect towel reuse signs by exploiting a common human foible.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency started a program to reduce hotel water consumption called the H2Otel Challenge. In addition to installing new equipment, such as water-efficient toilets, faucets, and shower heads, hotels are encouraged to give guests the option of reusing their towels and sheets with those little signs that have become ubiquitous across the United States. You know, the ones that look like this:

Flickr user Joel Kramer

What the EPA doesn’t mention (at least in its factsheets available online) is that the wording used in designing these signs matters–a lot.

Read the rest here

Gardens, Not Graves

by 

The stream—that great glut of ideas, opinions, updates, and ephemera that pours through us every day—is the dominant way we organize content. It makes sense; the stream’s popularity springs from the days of the early social web, when a huge number of users posted all types of content on unpredictable schedules. The simplest way to show updates to new readers focused on reverse chronology and small, discrete chunks, as sorting by newness called for content quick to both produce and digest. This approach saw wide adoption in blogs, social networks, notification systems, etc., and ever since we’ve flitted from one stream to another like sugar-starved hummingbirds.

Problem is, the stream’s emphasis on the new above all else imposes a short lifespan on content.

Read the rest

Designing Content First for a Better UX

by LIAM KING

Why design content-first?

Because content is UX.

If the primary purpose of websites is to deliver valuable content to an audience, we should be designing content-first for the best possible UX.

But we frequently miss the opportunity to validate and iterate our UX designs with content insights, instead waiting until the final stages to unite signed off content and design.

Read the rest

UX and Content Strategy: How They Are Related and Why You Should Care

by ARMEN GHAZARIAN

What is more important: User experience or content?

I hate this type of question and to me they don’t make sense. It’s like asking a kid who he loves more — mom or dad. Or even worse, trying to figure out which came first — the chicken or the egg? But unlike the age old causality dilemma, this question has an answer.

Read the rest