6 Tips to Launching a Global Content Strategy

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Imagine you’re the lead content marketer at a global brand, and you just knocked your first campaign out of the park. Results have exceeded expectations, and you’re now tasked with developing a larger global content strategy that calls for content in English, German, and Portuguese. There’s a tight deadline and a lot of cooks in the kitchen, all with their own cultural differences and communication challenges. Oh, and you need to have the Portuguese and German articles transcreated into English for a US audience.

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Why Underpaying Writers Can Kill Your Content Marketing

by Debra Donston-Miller

As brands rush to publish blog posts, videos, white papers, news articles, feature stories, and other types of content to build relationships with consumers, they’re often outsourcing the actual creation of content. What they are finding is that they can choose to pay either a lot or a little for content, but going the latter route often costs far more in the end.

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5 Ways Pitch Perfect Should Inform Your Content Strategy

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After nine months spent writing a book about content, content marketing and content strategy, I felt brain dead. My husband lovingly suggested we take our family away to the beach so I could “recover” for a few days.

While buying the usual sunscreen and other beach necessities, I noticed the DVD of the movie Pitch Perfect. I had watched the movie on a girls’ movie night, and thought it was super cute. Having two girls, ages 10 and 7, I thought it would be the perfect movie to while away the time we spent driving to the beach.

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Read About How Hotels Get You To Reuse Towels. Everyone’s Doing It.

by ERIC JAFFE

Researchers have figured out how to create (almost) perfect towel reuse signs by exploiting a common human foible.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency started a program to reduce hotel water consumption called the H2Otel Challenge. In addition to installing new equipment, such as water-efficient toilets, faucets, and shower heads, hotels are encouraged to give guests the option of reusing their towels and sheets with those little signs that have become ubiquitous across the United States. You know, the ones that look like this:

Flickr user Joel Kramer

What the EPA doesn’t mention (at least in its factsheets available online) is that the wording used in designing these signs matters–a lot.

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