Why Your Design Process Should Start with Content

by JOHN MOORE WILLIAMS

If you’ve been around the world of web design for a while, you’ve heard of the concept of “content first.” In this article, we explore what it is, why it’s so helpful when you’re designing with Webflow CMS, and provide an example of content-first design in action.

Read the whole story here!

Microsoft’s Radical Bet on a New Type of Design Thinking

by Cliff Kuang

By studying underserved communities, the tech giant hopes to improve the user experience for everyone.

3054927-inline-s-3-microsofts-inclusive-designRalf-Finn Hestoft/Corbis (1960s)

“To build machines that better adapt to humans, there needs to be a more robust process for watching how humans adapt to each other, and to their world.”

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UX Inspiration: Why Does Color Matter?

by , Vice President of User Experience and Chief Design Officer at SAP Ariba

why does color matter?

Colors affect us in countless ways—mentally and physically, consciously and subconsciously. Psychologists have suggested that color impression can account for 60% of the acceptance or rejection of a product or service. Good color choices should never be neglected. A bad color combination can have the same negative effect as poor copy and slow load times.

Read the whole amazing article!

A Field Guide to Your Career in UX

by Lisa O’Malley

I created a handy little guide for Intuit’s UX Community to answer the question: “What do UX professionals need to do their best work?”

It may be pocket-sized, but it packs a big punch for anyone who claims UX in their job title. Inside you’ll find lots of handy tips on how to turn up your awesomeness, including:

  • Nailing the interview and portfolio review.
  • Assessing your strengths and identify areas of improvement.
  • Surefire ways to stay inspired.
  • Tips on building a killer UX team.

Download your very own Intuit XD Field Guide!

Hey Designers: Stop Being An Afterthought

by

There are reasons you’re still saying the same thing after all these years — still talking about how it always seems like design gets tacked on to the end of the process. You should be at the concept meeting, you say, where you can make a real difference.

Read the whole article. It’s awesome.

Gardens, Not Graves

by 

The stream—that great glut of ideas, opinions, updates, and ephemera that pours through us every day—is the dominant way we organize content. It makes sense; the stream’s popularity springs from the days of the early social web, when a huge number of users posted all types of content on unpredictable schedules. The simplest way to show updates to new readers focused on reverse chronology and small, discrete chunks, as sorting by newness called for content quick to both produce and digest. This approach saw wide adoption in blogs, social networks, notification systems, etc., and ever since we’ve flitted from one stream to another like sugar-starved hummingbirds.

Problem is, the stream’s emphasis on the new above all else imposes a short lifespan on content.

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Look. Listen.

by LISA O

Have you ever had a waiter get your order completely wrong? This frustrating scenario easily can be applied to today’s fast-paced, app-obsessed businesses. Time after time, we see products and services that customers didn’t want or need. It’s a waste of time, resources, and money.

The trick to overcoming this is pretty simple: stop insisting that your business tell people what they want or need.

Instead, observe your customers’ daily lives, ask them what their biggest challenges are, and find out what they dream about. Get to know your customers like they’re your friends. Then, and only then, can you really find out what they want or need.

Want to know your customers more? Here are two well-established resources you can actually use: